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Grizzly Bear

Animals Home > Mammals
 
The Grizzly Bear is an endangered species in North America. They live only in Western Canada and the Western United States. Grizzly Bears, when fully grown have been known to weigh up to 1500 pounds. Males are significantly larger than their female counterparts.
  Curious Grizzly Bear
 
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Description Other Names Conservation  
 

Description

Latin Name: Ursus arctos horribilis Conservation Status: Endangered
Distribution: Alaska, Western Canada, Western United States Average Weight: 400 - 1500 lbs
 

The Grizzly Bear ranges in colour from light brown to near black. They are primarily nocturnal, and live and hunt alone. They can be found near rivers and streams when the salmon are swimming upstream. They are omnivorous, and other food include plants, berries, fungus, and other small animals.

The physical appearance of Grizzly Bears differs because they have a large lump above their shoulders. This is actually entirely made up of muscle that provides incredible strength to their front arms. They use their fronts arms for digging in the ground. The Grizzly Bear can run incredibly fast considering its large and awkward looking body.

Grizzly Bears live by themselves so usually the only time you will see them in groups is during the salmon spawning season. During this time large groups of Grizzly Bears will collect at the river edge to catch the passing salmon. Although they prefer fish, if they are not available the Grizzly Bear will feed on much larger animals. This can include animals as large as deer and moose.

Grizzly Bears are known for having a very good memory. Because of this memory they return to the same area where campers have left food before.

 

Other Names

Grizzly Bears are also known as the Silvertip Bear.
 

Conservation

The Grizzly Bear is currently listed as endangered. In January 2006, they were recommended to be removed from the endangered species list. They have also been found to be coming back into local areas where they were previously extinct.
 

         
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